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Albuquerque Optometrists

What to Know About Blue Light Blocking Glasses

Blue light blocking glasses has been a trending topic. These are glasses or lenses that are specially designed to block blue light that emits from LED or CFL lights, computer monitors, phones, TVs, and other digital screens. Blue light can come from almost any light source including the sun.

Our current lifestyles expose our eyes to more blue light for longer periods during the day. Where previously we may have only been exposed to blue light from the sun, many people now spend more hours in front of screens or under fluorescent lights throughout the day and after the sun has gone down. For some, this exposure can cause eye strain and physical discomfort.

Benefits of Blue Light

Blue light can boost our moods, help with memory and cognitive function, and make us more alert. Blue light is an important factor in regulating our circadian rhythm – the body’s natural wake and sleep cycle. 

The growth and development of children’s eyes could be affected by not getting enough blue light from the sunlight. Some studies are showing that a deficiency in blue light exposure could contribute to the recent increase in myopia.

Blue Light and Damage to the Eyes

There is not currently enough evidence to suggest that blue light from digital screens will cause any harm. Intense blue light from sunlight can raise the risk of macular degeneration, cataracts, and other eye diseases, the same level is not emitted from computers or other artificial blue light sources.

More studies are needed to understand if blue light from monitors causes optic damage but there is no harm in wearing blue light blocking lenses.

There is some concern that long-term exposure, the nearness of screens, and the length of time spent on them could affect eyes over time and lead to digital eye strain. People also tend to blink less while looking at screens causing the eyes to feel dry, irritated, or burn.

Discuss any concerns you have with your eye health with your local optometrist. Factors such as age, eye conditions, length of exposure, and general eye health can play a role in your decision to use blue light blocking lenses. Your primary eye care doctor will be able to help you make an informed decision.

What is known, is that too much blue light exposure at night can disrupt the circadian rhythm. This can lead to problems with sleep which affects your overall health. 

Digital Eye Strain

A survey from the American Optometric Society found that most adults, 58%, experience some form of digital eye strain. The study conducted in 2015 noted the average U.S. worker spends about seven hours a day on the computer at work or home. A more recent survey showed that at the end of 2019, U.S. adults were spending almost 12 hours in front of a screen. The increased screen time may create digital eye strain for some individuals. It may also make symptoms of digital eye strain worse.

Symptoms of Digital Eye Strain

Individuals can experience digital eye strain differently. Common symptoms can include:

  • Dry eyes
  • Blurry vision
  • Tearing or watery eyes
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Neck strain

How to Ease Digital Eye Strain

There are steps you can take to reduce digital eye strain:

  • Take breaks from screens often
  • Increase the contrast on your screen
  • Use artificial tears
  • Try to minimize glare
  • Blink frequently.

Choosing Blue Light Blocking Glasses

Although science hasn’t been able to verify that blue light causes eye diseases, many people who’ve tried a pair of blue light blocking glasses have found them to be effective at improving sleep and reducing eye strain. They can protect your eyes from artificial blue light. 

We use Zeiss lenses at Eyes of New Mexico Family Optometry and Contact Lenses offering superior technology. Blue light blocking technology is incorporated into the lenses themselves as opposed to just using coatings that provide up to 50% less reflection. Together this can help to reduce digital eye strain and eye fatigue.

Zeiss lenses can fit into any frames. Our Albuquerque clinic has some great eyeglass frames from Etnia Barcelona, Modo, Eco, Ovvo, and more for you to choose from. Our experts can help you choose the perfect frames and lenses for your vision needs and lifestyle.

It is also important to protect the eyes from the sun. Wear UV-blocking sunglasses when outside. We also carry sunglasses and can help you find the best pair for you.

If you have concerns about eye strain or about the amount of time you spend looking at screens, book an appointment and discuss blue light blocking lenses with an optometrist at our Albuquerque clinic. 

Childhood Myopia: What It Is and What You Can Do To Help Your Child.

Dozens of parents bring their children into our practices every day for eye exams and other services, and many ask us questions about myopia. While instances and awareness of myopia are on the rise, to help spread myopia awareness we’ve written out the basics on childhood myopia, why it matters, and what you as a parent can do to help preserve your child’s eye health in the long run.

What is Myopia?

Myopia (often referred to as nearsightedness) is the most common cause of impaired vision in people under age 40, and its prevalence in children is growing at an alarming rate.

Myopia typically starts in childhood and progresses (the eye keeps getting bigger), or gets worse, until early adulthood. During this time the symptom of myopia, blurry distance vision, gets worse, meaning the patient needs stronger glasses to continue to see clearly. If blurry distance vision is the symptom of myopia, what exactly is myopia? Stated again, myopia is an eye that is growing too long. How do we know this?

We measure it using special non-invasive technology to calculate the length of the eye from the front (cornea) to the back (retina). This distance is known as the axial length and is measured down to fractions of a millimeter with advanced equipment. So, myopia is an abnormal elongation of the eye.

Risk Factors for Myopia

Myopia risk factors include genetics (having one or both parents myopic), an insufficient amount of time spent outdoors, and excessive near work (time spent reading, school work, & digital screens).

Childhood myopia is progressive, which is why your child may need a new prescription every year or two. Unless treated, a child’s myopia will continue to worsen until early adulthood. What some people don’t realize is that myopia is far more than simply blurred vision — it’s associated with drastically higher risk of developing eye disease in the future.

How Can Myopia Impact a Child’s Health?

Childhood myopia places a child at a greater risk of developing serious eye diseases later in life, as compared to non-myopic children, and the odds only increase as myopia continues to progress.

In fact, a child with myopia is 2 to 40 times more likely to develop myopic maculopathy (also known as myopic macular degeneration, a serious vision-threatening complication) depending on their degree of nearsightedness.

Retinal detachment is another serious eye condition that can cause permanent blindness. A myopic child is 3 to 21 times more likely to develop this emergency eye condition in adulthood.

Moreover, children with myopia have a threefold risk of developing glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide, in the long run.

And although cataracts are considered a normal part of aging, having myopia advances the age at which they develop. According to a study published in JAMA Ophthalmology, individuals with high myopia are more likely to need cataract surgery at an earlier age than those with no myopia.

Furthermore, aside from an increased risk of adult eye disease, untreated myopia can prevent a child from succeeding academically and socially.

A 2019 study published in the Community Eye Health Journal underscores the importance of excellent visual acuity in school-aged children. It found that offering vision correction to students with myopia has more of an educational impact than providing them with vitamins or medications to maintain or improve their physical health.

Myopia has equally serious ramifications outside the classroom. A study published in BMC Ophthalmology (2016) found that adolescents with myopia are more likely to have anxiety than their peers with normal vision.

Furthermore, adverse visual symptoms impact a child’s self-esteem, according to a study published in the Journal of Optometry and Vision Science.

The good news is that certain lifestyle choices, especially when coupled with myopia management treatment, can have a lasting positive effect on your child’s eye health.

What Can Parents Do To Help Slow Myopia Progression?

We know that parents want what’s best for their children. So here are a few recommendations that will help keep your child’s eyes healthy — whether or not myopia has set in.

Take your kids outside to play. Several studies have indicated that children who spend over 2 hours outdoors during the day have lower levels of myopia and slower myopia progression.

A recent study published in BMC Ophthalmology and cited in Review of Optometry (2021) found that for non-myopic children with myopic parents, “a high level of outdoor exposure had a remarkable influence on the risk of new myopia for children even with one myopic parent.”

Although it’s not always easy, try to limit the amount of continuous near work your child does. Whether it’s reading or scrolling through a phone, remind your child to take breaks.

However, the most important thing you can do to protect your child’s long-term eye health is manage their myopia with treatment.

We Can Help Preserve Your Child’s Eye Health

At Treehouse Eyes, our goal is to provide expert care to each and every child with kindness and a smile.

Our state-of-the-art equipment and diagnostic technology enable us to thoroughly assess your child’s visual condition and needs. We offer the latest treatments to manage your child’s myopia and effectively slow down how quickly myopia progresses.

Help your child succeed in school and in activities, and offer them a better overall quality of life with myopia management.

Give your child the tools they need to succeed! To schedule your child’s back-to-school eye exam, visit Eyes of NM Family Optometry and Contact Lenses or to see a list of all providers near you visit Treehouse Eyes today.

Does Keratoconus Cause Blindness?

Keratoconus is an eye disease causing the cornea to thin out and bulge into the shape of a cone. It can change rapidly and requires ongoing care and treatment. There is no cure for keratoconus and the only treatment that can stop the progression is corneal crosslinking. But does keratoconus cause blindness?

Keratoconus Progression and Timelines

Patients are often diagnosed with keratoconus in their early teens. The disease may progress slowly initially but will progress more quickly without treatment. The eye condition can progress more rapidly in younger patients.

Sudden swelling can lead to corneal scarring which can worsen the disorder very quickly. Vision will continue to deteriorate with progression of the disease peaking around the age of 40. Around mid-adulthood, the shape of the cornea remains stable reports the U.S National Library of Medicine.

Keratoconus can affect one eye or both eyes. If a patient has keratoconus in both eyes, the rate of deterioration can develop unequally and is often significantly more advanced in one eye.

Does Keratoconus Cause Blindness?

Swelling and scarring of the cornea can cause reduced or blurred vision. Vision can deteriorate to a degree that it is difficult to lead a normal life.

If the cornea has significant scarring, your eye doctor may recommend a cornea transplant. This is for the most severe cases and a surgery called keratoplasty can help the patient to restore vision.

Keratoconus does not typically lead to complete blindness but patients can lose vision to a point where they are legally blind or have low vision. This happens in a small percentage of cases. Most patients have access to good eye doctors that specialize in keratoconus to detect it early and develop a treatment plan for the patient to follow. With an eye care team in place, most patients will not see a decline to total loss of sight.

Steps to Take If You Have Keratoconus

If you’ve been diagnosed with Keratoconus or it is present in your family, take proactive steps.

Regular eye exams and early detection are key for preserving vision as long as possible.

Work closely with an eye doctor with experience treating keratoconus. Follow their treatment plan and let them know of any changes you’re experiencing. If prescribed contact lenses, follow instructions from your optometrist and clean them diligently to avoid an eye infection that could lead to corneal scarring.

Keratoconus Specialists at Eyes of NM Family Optometry and Contact Lenses

Finding a good corneal specialist as early as possible in your diagnosis will provide the best outcome. Our team of optometrists at our eye clinic in Albuquerque is passionate about helping individuals live their best lives through having the best possible vision.

 

Photo by MART PRODUCTION from Pexels

Join us for our 10 year Anniversary

To celebrate our 10 year anniversary, we’re celebrating with the latest styles from Maui Jim and Etnia Barcelona.

Join us for a trunk show Friday, October 29, 2021 from 12-4 pm to see the latest inventory from representatives for Maui Jim and Etnia Barcelona. We’re excited to see the newest styles and to celebrate our 10 years in the Albuquerque community with you.

5 Spooky Things You Didn’t Know About Myopia

Myopia (most often referred to as nearsightedness) affects about one in every three children in the United States and has become increasingly prevalent over the last 30 years.

Myopia is an eye disease that occurs when the eye grows too long—like the shape of a football.  This causes distant objects to appear blurry and increases the risk of serious, sight-threatening eye diseases in adulthood.

As a parent, you want what’s best for your child. By learning these 5 important facts, you may feel encouraged to do more for your child’s eye health and long-term vision—such as ensuring that they get their eyes checked on a regular basis and turning to myopia management to prevent the rapid progression of this disease.

The COVID-19 Pandemic Has Increased Myopia Prevalence In Children

The significant reduction in outdoor time during the pandemic combined with the surge in screen time has increased the incidence of myopia cases. According to a systematic review and meta-analysis published in Ophthalmic Research (2020), outdoor time helps slow down the change of axial length and reduce the risk of myopia.

Similar results were found in a previous study in Ophthalmology (2013) that investigated the association between myopia in children and adolescents, and the amount of time spent outdoors. The study analyzed over 10,000 children and adolescents aged 20 and under and concluded a substantial correlation between increased time spent outside and the prevalence of myopia. Each additional hour spent outside per week was linked to a 2% reduction in the risk of myopia.

Myopia Increases the Risk of Eye Disease

Those with high myopia and rapidly progressing myopia in childhood are more prone to developing ocular comorbidities or serious sight-threatening eye diseases later in life, such as:

  • Glaucoma
  • Macular degeneration
  • Myopic Maculopathy
  • Retinal detachment

Myopia is a Progressive Eye Disease

Myopia usually starts in childhood and progresses throughout a child’s school years, eventually stabilizing around ages 18-22.

Since the eye grows in sync with the rest of the body, it’s only natural that it ceases elongating in early adulthood when the rest of the body stops growing. This also means that a child’s growth spurts often coincide with a higher prescription.

Fortunately, myopia can be efficiently treated in order to prevent it from worsening as the child grows. Slowing myopia early in life can make a significant difference in your child’s eye health in their present and future.

Myopia Is An Epidemic

Myopia is a global epidemic that continues to worsen, affecting close to 2 billion individuals worldwide.

If current trends hold, roughly half of the world’s population will be myopic by the year 2050, partly due to genetics and increasingly as a result of our society’s preference for staying indoors and spending more time on digital screens.

Myopia Can Be Treated

Myopia cannot be cured; however, its progression can be slowed or even halted.

The goal of myopia treatment, also known as myopia management or myopia control, is to reduce or halt the eye’s rapid growth. Effective myopia treatment entails more than simply correcting a child’s blurry vision with glasses; it’s meant to prevent a child’s vision from deteriorating and, thus lowering their risk of developing severe myopia-related eye diseases later in life.

Give your child the tools they need to succeed! To schedule your child’s back-to-school eye exam, visit Eyes of NM Family Optometry and Contact Lenses or to see a list of all providers near you visit Treehouse Eyes today.

How Can I Find a Keratoconus Specialist?

If you’ve just been diagnosed with keratoconus or have a family history, you’ll want to find the best keratoconus specialist near you for your ongoing treatment.

Keratoconus Develops Rapidly

One of the differences between keratoconus and other eye diseases is how quickly it can progress. With an eye disease that changes often, it is important to find an eye doctor you feel comfortable with. Keratoconus requires an ongoing relationship with frequent appointments for best management.

An optometrist that specializes in diagnosing keratoconus and the treatment of keratoconus will often have special equipment allowing them to recognize keratoconus sooner than other optometry clinics.

Sometimes Develops in Families

While it is not known exactly what causes keratoconus, one factor is that it can sometimes be hereditary. If your family has a history of keratoconus, it is recommended to find an eye doctor near you that specializes in keratoconus for early detection. Keratoconus can start developing during the teenage years.

Treating Keratoconus

Treatment options for keratoconus may include eyeglasses or contact lenses, custom scleral contact lenses or custom rigid gas permeable lenses, Intacs, corneal collagen cross linking, and eye surgery or a cornea transplant.

In the early stages, patients are often fitted for glasses or contact lenses. The prescription may change often as the disease progresses.

Custom scleral contact lenses are often prescribed as they can be more comfortable for patients with keratoconus as they vault over the cornea of the eye. Patients with keratoconus have a cone-shaped cornea which may make it difficult to wear soft contact lenses. It can be helpful if the optometrist managing your keratoconus is also able to fit you for custom scleral contact lenses. Many patients that suffer from corneal eye diseases will find custom scleral contact lenses a good option.

If Intacs, corneal crosslinking, and/or cornea surgery or corneal transplants is recommended, your eye doctor will refer you to an ophthalmologist who specializes in the surgical treatment of keratoconus. Together, both eye doctors will develop an individualized treatment plan before and after the surgery and will co-manage the treatment of your keratoconus.

Keratoconus Specialists Stay Informed

Having a cornea eye specialist managing your keratoconus means they stay informed of the latest treatments and best practices for managing keratoconus.

When looking for a keratoconus specialist to treat your eye disease, find an eye doctor near you that:

  • You feel comfortable with,
  • Has the necessary equipment for early detection of keratoconus,
  • Can fit you with custom scleral contact lenses,
  • Works with an ophthalmologist specializing in keratoconus surgical options if your corneal disease progresses and requires surgery,
  • Regularly works with other keratoconus patients and specializes in the treatment of keratoconus.

Albuquerque Optometrists that Specialize in Keratoconus

The optometrists at Eyes of New Mexico Family Optometry and Contact Lenses in Albuquerque are specialists in treating keratoconus. If you or your family has a keratoconus diagnosis or you’d like to find out, book an appointment at our Albuquerque clinic. We’ll get started with an eye exam to see where we can improve vision and increase the comfort of your eyes.

Global Myopia Awareness Coalition (GMAC) Launches “Little Kid License” Myopia Awareness Campaign

The Global Myopia Awareness Coalition (GMAC) recently launched its “Little Kid License” campaign to continue to raise awareness of childhood myopia and the new treatment options available. GMAC, of which Treehouse Eyes is a member, invited junior racers to the go-kart track for an unexpected eye exam before heading out for some fun!

A recent survey of parents by the Global Myopia Awareness Coalition found ​​”… half of the parents reported their children spent more than four hours using electronic devices each day during the pandemic, compared to 18% of parents reporting the same behavior prior to the pandemic.”

Most children don’t notice anything is wrong with their vision until it starts to really impact their activities. Eye screenings done by a pediatrician are important, but they don’t always pick up on myopia, especially at lower levels. This is why GMAC decided it was more important than ever to raise awareness of myopia and the treatments available. Watch the “Little Kid License” video now:

In the same survey mentioned above, GMAC discovered that “… more than 70% of parents believe their pediatrician will flag any issues related to their children’s eyesight and, almost the same amount trust that their child would say something if they had vision issues.” Unfortunately, this is often not the case.

But, why is this such an important problem to face? Myopia develops rapidly as children grow. Remember, your child’s eye grows like any other part of their body as they age. Since children are prone to growth spurts, naturally their eyes are as well. Myopia occurs when a child’s eyes grow too fast, leading to blurry distance vision and greater risk for eye diseases later in life.

We know the start of the school year is insanely busy with back-to-school activities along with the everyday obligations of work and life, but it’s now more important than ever to find a provider that understands how to diagnose and treat your child’s myopia.

Give your child the tools they need to succeed! To schedule your child’s back-to-school eye exam, visit Eyes of New Mexico Family Optometry and Contact Lenses in Albuquerque or to see a list of all providers near you visit Treehouse Eyes today.

7 Tips for Using Scleral Contact Lenses

Scleral contact lenses are larger diameter Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) lenses. The larger size of scleral contact lenses fits vaults over the cornea of the eye.

They are often a good option for patients with corneal diseases like keratoconus and pellucid degeneration.

Scleral contact lenses can be customized for each individual patient providing a more comfortable fit. Other benefits of scleral contact lenses are clear vision and improved dryness. 

Be patient as you learn to adjust to wearing scleral contact lenses. It will take a bit of practice. 

1. Not the Same as Other Lenses

Scleral Contact Lenses are inserted and removed differently than regular contact lenses. This can take some time to adjust to. This video provides some tips on inserting and removing scleral contact lenses as well as caring for them, we also have a video here. You may need to try several insertion and removal methods before finding the one that works well for you.

2. Cleaning Regularly

Like any contact lens wearers, regular cleaning is essential. Make sure you’re washing your hands thoroughly before inserting scleral lenses and for lens removal.

Use only recommended products to keep lenses and your eyes in the best condition. Follow instructions from your eye doctor on proper lens care and cleaning methods.

Regularly clean your contact lens case as well.

Good hygiene will prevent eye infections.

3. Removing Scleral Contact Lenses

A drop or two of preservative-free artificial tears or saline into the eye before removing and a gentle massage can help to loosen the lens. For most wearers, it is best to remove their lenses about one hour before going to bed. 

4. UV Protection

We recommend wearing sunglasses with your custom scleral contact lenses to protect your eyes from UV rays. 

5. When Wearing Makeup

For those that would like to wear makeup while wearing scleral lenses, there are a few minor adjustments.

Put your custom scleral contact lenses in before applying your makeup. Choose cream rather than powders and eye-friendly, hypoallergenic products. Don’t use eyeliner on the inside rims of the eyes.

Remove lenses before cleaning off makeup. 

6. Facial Moisturizer

Avoid oil-based moisturizers on the eyelids.

7. Avoid Wearing Lenses on a Plane

For anyone wearing contact lenses, wear your glasses when flying if you are able to. The air in aircraft cabins is very low causing your eyes to become dry and uncomfortable. Put them in as soon as you land when you are able to do so. 

There are many benefits to custom scleral contact lenses for patients. With a bit of time and practice, scleral contact lenses will become part of your routine. A scleral lens fitting may take more time but patients often find them more comfortable.

They will help to keep the cornea healthy and with their wider diameter are often more comfortable for better patient vision and comfort. Fitting scleral lenses properly can also help with dry eyes as the scleral lens design is to vault over the eye, protecting the cornea underneath. Follow all of the recommendations provided to you by our optometrists

Contact our Albuquerque office if you are having any issues or to book an appointment for a custom scleral contact lenses consultation and fitting.

Photo by Nataliya Vaitkevich from Pexels

How You Can Help Your Child Excel in School This Year

The start of a new school year can be overwhelming, even for the most confident children. That’s why parents are doing whatever they can to help their children successfully transition to the next academic grade. Below, we share our top tips for parents, so they can ensure that their child’s vision is a tool for success in school.

1.   Balance Indoor and Outdoor Time

Outdoor play offers numerous benefits, but many children aren’t getting enough of it. Most children spend much of their time indoors, whether in a classroom, at home, or in after-school activities.

Kids who regularly play outdoors have improved motor skills, feel more independent, and practice important social skills.

But the main benefit of “outdoor time” that eye doctors like to focus on is the lower incidence of myopia (where distant objects appear blurry). Numerous studies published in journals like Ophthalmic Research and Review Of Optometry have shown that children who spend 1.5-2.5 hours per day outdoors during the daytime have a reduced risk of becoming myopic or, if they have myopia, it progresses at a slower pace.

Sending your kids outside to play every day will help their vision, overall health, and contribute to academic success. 

2.   Encourage Your Child To Take Frequent Breaks

Once the new school year begins, students are often busy with daily homework, reading assignments, and visually demanding recreational activities like video games.

While all of these activities are important, they shouldn’t be done without periodic breathers. 

Eye strain is a real concern for the many students who spend hours in front of a book or screen and can put a damper on their grades.

Minimally, have your child follow the 20-20-20 rule: every 20 minutes they should focus for 20 seconds on an object that’s at least 20 feet away.

Even better, encourage slightly longer breaks for a snack in the sun, or a quick walk around the block to allow their eyes to focus on more distant objects.

3.   Have Their Eyes Examined by an Optometrist

Whether or not your child wears glasses, yearly eye exams will help ensure healthy visual development.

It’s no surprise that children who don’t see well perform at a lower level than their peers. In some cases, young children aren’t even aware that their vision has changed, or they may not be able to verbally express it.

At our practice, our eye exams go far beyond the standard vision screenings offered in school. We thoroughly check your child’s eye health and several visual skills, including visual acuity, focusing, tracking and teaming.

If your child has myopia we will discuss if they are a candidate for myopia management. Myopia management treatments can slow or stop myopia in children and teens and doing so will minimize their risk of developing serious eye diseases later in life.

4.   Filter Out Blue Light

Now, more than ever, children’s eyes are focusing on screens of all shapes and sizes. While science hasn’t yet confirmed the damaging effects of blue light on a child’s eyes, one thing is certain: blue light exposure (especially in the evening) can lead to reduced sleep quality.

Good-quality sleep is crucial for cognitive and physical development, which is why many parents purchase blue light glasses or utilize blue light filters such as screens and software on devices. Blue light also contributes to digital eye strain, leading to symptoms like eye pain, headaches, blurred vision and dry eyes.  If your child uses a tablet, smartphone, or computer before bedtime, speak with us about whether blue light glasses or lens coatings can help.

Give your child the tools they need to succeed! To schedule your child’s back-to-school eye exam, visit Eyes of NM Family Optometry and Contact Lenses or see a list of all providers at Treehouse Eyes today.

Is there a link between Keratoconus and Sleep Apnea?

If you’re sleepy during the day, you may attribute that to vision problems associated with keratoconus. But studies have found that people with keratoconus are at a higher rate of having Sleep Apnea than patients without keratoconus.

What is Keratoconus?

Having keratoconus means the cornea starts to thin and bulge into a cone shape. People with this eye disorder will often have decreased vision, blurry vision, and sensitivity to light and glare. This eye disorder generally worsens over time.

Those with a family history of keratoconus are at higher risk for developing it themselves. Individuals with Down syndrome, Marfan syndrome, or a congenital disorder are also known to develop Keratoconus. 

What is Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

If you stop breathing involuntarily briefly while sleeping, you may have sleep apnea. This can happen hundreds of times during your sleep without waking you so you don’t even notice it.

There are three types of sleep apnea provided on the Sleep Foundation website:

  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA): OSA occurs when the airway at the back of the throat becomes physically blocked. That obstruction causes temporary lapses in the breath.
  • Central Sleep Apnea (CSA): CSA happens because there is a problem with the brain’s system for controlling muscles involved in respiration, leading to slower and shallower breathing. This is a rare form of sleep apnea.
  • Mixed Sleep Apnea: When a person has both OSA and CSA at the same time, it is referred to as mixed sleep apnea or complex sleep apnea.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea is a common sleep disorder that affects children and adults. Obesity, having a large neck, a family history, or excessive drug and alcohol use, can all lead to an increased risk of developing or having OSA. 

Research on Keratoconus and OSA

A 2018 study published in Cornea, found that “OSA was 10 to 20 times more prevalent among patients with KCN than the rate reported for the general population.”

This 2019 study reviewed five studies on the association between keratoconus and OSA and found there is a correlation.

Researchers aren’t entirely sure why there is a link between keratoconus and OSA, but multiple studies have found this to be the case. 

Do I have OSA?

Most studies use the Berlin Questionnaire to determine the risk level for sleep apnea. If you’re curious how you would score, you can take the Berlin Questionnaire here to see what your risk factor is. Of course, you should always seek a qualified medical diagnosis and treatment.

Patients with Keratoconus Should Speak to Their Doctor About OSA

If you have keratoconus, consider discussing sleep apnea with your primary care physician. 

Patients with keratoconus may attribute their sleepiness to their corneal disorder. Knowing they are at higher risk for having sleep apnea may allow them to seek a medical diagnosis sooner to receive treatment.

Do I have Keratoconus?

Early detection of keratoconus may give you more treatment options for managing this cornea condition. Our Albuquerque office specializes in keratoconus diagnosis and management and we have technology available that can help us detect keratoconus sooner than other eye care clinics. There is no cure for keratoconus but it can be managed and corneal crosslinking can slow the progression.

If there is a family history of keratoconus, or you’re experiencing poor or blurry vision, make an appointment with our eye doctors so we can create a treatment plan for you.

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